42

Nothing to see here, so move it along.

griseus:

The marine eels and other members of the superorder  Elopomorpha have a leptocephalus larval stage, which are flat and transparent. This group is quite diverse, containing 801 species in 24 orders, 24 families and 156 genera (super diverse). 

Leptocephali have compressed bodies that contain jelly-like substances on the inside, with a thin layer of muscle with visible myomeres on the outside, a simple tube as a gut, dorsal and anal fins, but they lack pelvic fins. They also don’t have any red blood cells (most likely is respiration by passive diffusion), which they only begin produce when the change into the juvenile glass eel stage. Appears to feed on marine snow, tiny free-floating particles in the ocean.

This large size leptocephalus must be a species of Muraenidae (moray eels), and probably the larva of a long thin ribbon eel, which is metamorphosing, and is entering shallow water to finish metamorphosis into a young eel, in Bali, Indonesia.

(via somuchscience)

zerostatereflex:

Hand in Hot Ice 
Awesome! :D
"This works because the substance is not "ice" as in water, but a different substance called sodium acetate trihydrate. Normally solid sodium acetate was melted into a liquid that was then supercooled to below its melting point. In this state, adding nucleation sites, like the crystals on my hand, rapidly causes the rest of the sodium acetate to crystallize."

zerostatereflex:

Hand in Hot Ice

Awesome! :D

"This works because the substance is not "ice" as in water, but a different substance called sodium acetate trihydrate. Normally solid sodium acetate was melted into a liquid that was then supercooled to below its melting point. In this state, adding nucleation sites, like the crystals on my hand, rapidly causes the rest of the sodium acetate to crystallize."

bagellie:

benefits of being friends with me

  • shitty jokes whenever you ask for them
  • shitty jokes whenever you don’t ask for them

(via tyleroakley)

cool-critters:

Temminck´s tragopan (Tragopan temminckii)

The Temminck’s tragopan is a medium-sized, approximately 64 cm long, pheasant in the genus Tragopan.

The male is a stocky red-and-orange bird with white-spotted plumage, black bill and pink legs. It has a bare blue facial skin, inflatable dark-blue lappet and horns.

The female is a white-spotted brown bird with blue circular eye skin. The diet consists mainly of berries, grass and plants.

The Temminck’s tragopan is distributed in forests of northern South Asia, from northeast India, northwest Vietnam, Tibet and northern provinces of China.

photo credits: allandoopheasantry, zetaboards, Peter Stubbs

(via for-science-sake)

~Cosplay / Halloween Special effects makeup Megapost~

rabababe:

allhollowseve:

Makeup:

How to cover your eyebrows

Acne covering makeup

Smokey eye

How to apply fake lashes

How to apply blush

How to apply foundation

How to apply eyeshadow

Contouring/highlighting

Winged eyeliner

Special Effects:

Flesh eating bacteria effect

Bite wounds

Gunshot wounds

Unzipped mouth

Slashed throat

Fake cuts

Knife wound

Tattoos:

How to make a temporary tattoo

How to cover tattoos

Aaaand saving for future reference.

(via sherlocked-avenger)

libutron:

Stapelianthus arenarius
As all species in the genus, Stapelianthus arenarius (Gentianales - Apocynaceae) is a stapeliad native to Madagascar, distinctive by its white flowers with five fleshy sepals (occasionally four), spotted red-brown in the center.
Reference: [1]
Photo credit: ©Mike Keeling | Locality: cultivated (2009)

libutron:

Stapelianthus arenarius

As all species in the genus, Stapelianthus arenarius (Gentianales - Apocynaceae) is a stapeliad native to Madagascar, distinctive by its white flowers with five fleshy sepals (occasionally four), spotted red-brown in the center.

Reference: [1]

Photo credit: ©Mike Keeling | Locality: cultivated (2009)

(via somuchscience)